St. Luke’s College of Medicine

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Curriculum

THE MEDICAL PROGRAM
INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND MATERIALS
EVALUATION, GRADING AND GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
MANAGEMENT OF INSTRUCTION
SCHOLARSHIPS, HONORS AND AWARDS

 

THE MEDICAL PROGRAM

 

In 2007, the St. Luke’s College of Medicine-William H. Quasha Memorial Doctor of Medicine (MD) program began its transition from the traditional curriculum to an integrative model with the introduction of new subjects that emphasize the continuum of the basic sciences with the clinical and to underscore the relevance of all clinical specialties in the care of every patient.

 

With this, new teaching-learning and evaluation strategies to enhance critical thinking and clinical competence were also introduced, and clinical exposure was initiated in earlier year levels to strengthen clinical competency and enhance doctor-patient communication skills.  In keeping with the College’s then novel thrust towards a robust foundation in medical research, novel Research courses were introduced to expand and enrich the students’ knowledge in and exposure to medical research by forming a continuum with basic biostatistics and epidemiology, which were already being taught.

 

Over the years, the College has moved towards a curriculum that advocates a patient-centered approach to healthcare and professionalism.   Thus, the curriculum has been expanded to focus not only on clinical competence and research literacy but also on compassionate professionalism.  To address these evolving needs, the following initiatives were introduced:

 

1.      The Patient-Centered Approach to Healthcare, which places the patient in the center of clinical care;

 

2.      The Adoption of Self-Directed Learning Strategies, which allows the students to share in the responsibility for their learning;

 

3.      The Introduction of Research Electives, which are geared to further develop research skills among interested students;

 

4.      The Initiation of Evaluation Strategies for Professionalism, to cultivate professional attitudes and to instill responsible behavior;

 

5.      The Establishment of Introduction to the Medical Profession, that serve to support and enhance the students’ personal and professional evolution into their roles as future medical professionals.

 

Unbeknownst to the College, these independent initiatives tracked well with the recent 2014 CHED directive towards Outcomes-Based Education, a learner-based education paradigm which emphasizes the development of the desirable attitudes, values and attributes of a medical professional aside from mere clinical competence.  To formalize its compliance to the CHED directive, the College has reformulated and documented all of its curricular learning outcomes to reflect its mission, vision and goals and summarized it under four new institutional outcomes that embody the ideal St. Luke’s College of Medicine Graduate.

 

Figure 1.In keeping with the 2014 CHED Guidelines, the College has reformulated all its curricular outcomes and has summarized it under four new institutional outcomes that embody the ideal St. Luke’s College of Medicine Graduate.

 

Today, the College offers a five-year MD program, with a medical curriculum that spans three years of integrated academic and clinical study, one year of clinical clerkship and a year of rotating internships. The Clerkship and Internship programs are offered exclusively at the St. Luke’s Medical Center.

 

The hallmark of our curriculum is its innovative integration and its strong fundamental focus on clinical knowledge, skills training and research and its earnest emphasis on professionalism and professional development. The St. Luke’s curriculum integrates all of these throughout the years of medical school and features:

 

1.      Rigorous training based on a broad base of knowledge and requisite clinical and research skills needed in the practice of medicine regardless of the graduate’s plans for specialization,

 

2.      Streamlined content and optimized course sequence to cover the absolute essentials amid the vast amount of available medical information,

 

3.      Optimized course hours resulting from the streamlining of high-yield content and integration of common learning themes across different subject areas,

 

4.      Better delineation of terminal competencies for each year level supported by teaching-learning strategies and educational innovations that enhance critical thinking and clinical analysis,    

 

5.      Early exposure to clinical scenarios in the classroom and at St. Luke’s Medical Center, and

 

6.      A keen focus on doctor-patient communication and a strong foundation in clinical skills and research.

 

7.      Emphasis on the development of the desirable personal and professional characteristics and conduct of a physician.

 

THE MEDICAL CORRICULUM

 

The First Year Curriculum

 

The First Year involves instruction in the three major basic science courses (Anatomy and Histology, Biochemistry, and Physiology), and in a uniquely designed integrated subject which is Foundations of Medicine (FOM). FOM is a course that integrates the basic and the clinical sciences as early as the first weeks of medical school. This course emphasizes both the essential building blocks for understanding medical science and their relevance to patient care.

 

The Second Year Curriculum

 

The Second Year includes the subjects General Pathology, Clinical Pathology, Microbiology and Parasitology, Preventive Medicine IIand Pharmacology.

Major clinical science subjects such as Medicine, Pediatrics, Surgery, Obstetrics, Neuroscience and Psychiatry are also introduced in this year level.  All knowledge and skills gleaned from these disciplines are supported and enhanced by another integrative course called Clinical Evaluation, which is designed to teach the students the art and science of physical diagnosis and its nuances across the different clinical specialties.

 

Also taught in this year is Medical Ethics, a subject that initiates the students into the ethical intricacies of medical practice and their implications. 

 

The Third Year Curriculum

 

The Third Year is designed to bolster clinical knowledge and skills by providing training in the clinical core subjects composed of Medicine, Pediatrics, Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Otorhinolaryngology, Ophthalmology, Emergency Medicine, and Radiology.

 

Merging these subjects isClinical Integrationwhich is formulated to train the students to consider and evaluate patients in a holistic manner by drawing from knowledge and skills from across the different clinical disciplines mentioned above.

 

Legal Medicineand Medical Jurisprudence are also required courses to complement the clinical subjects in this year level.

 

A seminar-based course called the Introduction to Clerkship prepares and orients the students about the working structure and programs of the hospital and equips them with important tools (Bio-Safety, Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Control Training, Infection Control, etc.), and other life-saving skills (Basic Life Support/ Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support Training) that will be helpful in actual patient encounters at the hospital.

 

The Fourth Year Curriculum

 

The Fourth Year or Clinical Clerkship gives the students the opportunity to begin his role as a physician. Clerkship aims to integrate the preceding three years of medical school with clinical skills training during the eleven (11) months of required clinical rotations and one (1) month of elective courses.

 

FOURTH YEAR (CLERKSHIP)

CLINICAL ROTATION

DURATION

Medicine

1 ¾ months

Medicine (San Lazaro)

1 week

Pediatrics

2 months

Surgery

1 ½ months + 2 weeks (Ortho)

OB-Gyne (St. Luke’s Medical Center)

1 month

OB-Gyne (East Avenue  Medical Center)

1 month

Preventive Medicine

1 month

Neuroscience

2 weeks

Clinical Psychiatry

2 weeks

Ophthalmology

2 weeks

ENT

2 weeks

ELECTIVES

Any two of the following:

 

Radiology

2 weeks

Rehabilitation Medicine

2 weeks

Pathology

2 weeks

Dermatology

2 weeks

Urology

2 weeks

Anesthesiology

2 weeks

Taguig Pateros District Hospital:

Medicine; Pediatrics; Surgery; OB-Gyne

2 weeks

 

The Fifth Year Curriculum

 

By functioning as a member of the healthcare team at the St. Luke’s Medical Center, the medical interns are expected to master the scientific knowledge, to acquire the essential skills and to develop the character suitable to the practice of medicine to the level of a general practitioner but with the aim of later pursuing specialization.  The St. Luke’s Medical Center, having been recognized as a center of excellence in various fields of expertise, becomes a uniquely fitting environment that primes and pushes our medical interns to a medical specialty.

 

Internship involves a 12-month program that dedicates a total of ten (10) months to required rotations and two (2) months to more expansive electives that encourage the interns to pursue further training and development in personal areas of interest.

 

FIFTH YEAR (INTERNSHIP)

CLINICAL ROTATION

DURATION

Medicine

2 months

Pediatrics

2 months

Surgery

1 ½ months + 2 weeks (Urology)

OB-Gyne

2 months

Preventive Medicine

1 month

Neuroscience

2 weeks

Clinical Psychiatry

2 weeks

ELECTIVES:

Any four 2-week electives or two 2-week electives plus one 4-week elective from among the following:

Anesthesiology

2 weeks

Rehabilitation Medicine

2 weeks

Radiology

2 weeks

Neuro-Radiology

2 weeks

Pedia-Radiology

2 weeks

Nuclear Medicine

2 weeks

Emergency Medicine

2 weeks

Pain Medicine

2 weeks

Medical Oncology

2 weeks

Radiation Oncology

2 weeks

Minimally Invasive Surgery (SLMC-BGC)

2 weeks

Surgery Oncology (SLMC-BGC)

2 weeks

Cardiology (SLMC-BGC)

2 weeks

Taguig Pateros District Hospital:

Medicine; Pediatrics; Surgery; OB-Gyne

2 weeks

Rehabilitation Medicine

2-4 weeks

Dermatology

2-4 weeks

ENT

2-4 weeks

Ophthalmology

2-4 weeks

Pathology

2-4 weeks

Orthopedics

2-4 weeks

Extended Electives:

 

Medicine

(+1 month)

Pediatrics

(+1 month)

Obstetrics and Gynecology

(+1 month)

Neurosciences

(+2 to 6 weeks)

Urology

(+2 weeks)

 

THE RESEARCH CURRICULUM

 

The College is committed to fostering, in its students, a strong foundation and lasting interest in research by offering fundamental courses in basic science and clinical research, as well as by brokering partnership with the Research and Biotechnology Group of St. Luke’s Medical Center.

 

The Research Curriculum is a continuum of several courses that introduce and hone the students in research and statistical methods necessary to the current practice of evidence-based medicine.  In the First Year, students are introduced to biostatistics, research methods, research planning and research protocol writing within the Preventive and Community Medicine I course.  The Basic Science Research course, which is designed to expose students to the molecular underpinnings of disease and therapy and to initiate them to the important interplay between laboratory-based research and medical practice, is then offered in the Second Year. Clinical Science Research, which is created to develop the students’ ability to critically appraise current medical literature and to train them in the design and conduct of various medical research studies, is then taught in the Third Year. In the clinical subjects and clinical rotations, this is then put into practice in case discussions, reports and presentations as well as in actual patient care.

 

Students who wish to do additional elective research may do so under the supervision of the various research departments of SLCM.

 

PROGRAM ON PROFESSIONALISM

 

SLCM places great emphasis on ensuring that medical students will imbibe an attitude of professionalism during their formative years. To increase awareness of professionalism, the college has initiated measures to highlight appropriate attitudes through novel activities and assessment processes. This includes the course,

 

Introduction to the Medical Profession (IMP) which is delivered in the first two years of the curriculum. The course aims to prepare students and ease them in to their future medical profession.  

 

Introduction to the Medical Profession I, is a course that delivers experiential learning material that would enable the students to effectively and competently tackle medical competencies and personal issues while providing a nurturing environment that encourages the students’ inquisitiveness, critical thinking, dynamism, innovation, dedication and self-reflection.

 

Introduction to the Medical Profession IIbuilds on the foundations of the competent self that was emphasized in the first year level course by now focusing on strengthening the doctor-patient relationship and advancing social advocacy and development.

 

Seminars are also placed at certain points in the third to fifth years as part of the continuum of the course.

 

PROGRAM ON PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

 

Throughout the five-year curriculum, students are given opportunities to help them seek their future field of specialization. In the First to Third Year, modules are prepared that serve to support and enhance the students’ personal and professional evolution into their future roles as future medical professionals.

 

In the subsequent years, preceptorships and special lectures by various clinicians from different specialties introduce the students to the many options they may consider for specialization.

 

Moreover, Clerks and Interns may opt to take their electives, outside of those listed, in other hospitals whether locally or abroad upon approval by the school administration. Some of the hospitals students have previously rotated in are:

 

Harvard Medical School-Brigham and Women’s Hospital

University of Massachusetts Medical Center

New York University Langone

University of Sydney

University of Western Australia- Sir Charles Gaidner Hospital

National University of Singapore

Singapore General Hospital

Ramathibodi Hospital Mahidol, Thailand

Tzu Chi Hospital, Taiwan

 

Proposals for other electives or extended electives in particular departments may also be accommodated to tailor to their eventual career track.

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INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND MATERIALS

 

 

Each required course or subject in the curriculum documents its learning objectives, the scope of its content, the teaching-learning activities it employs and the evaluation strategies it adopts in its instructional design. 

 

Various teaching- learning activities are employed based on the needs of the course and its contents. In the first three years, lectures and laboratory sessions are the main strategies in the basic sciences, while lectures and small-group discussions with actual patient encounters are fundamental in the clinical courses.  In clerkship and internship, teaching-learning activities mediated by hospital rotations and clinical work become the chief vehicles.

 

TEACHING MODALITIES

 

Lectures

 

During lectures, the important concepts and principles are emphasized and explained utilizing material in clinical contexts, providing a good background of the field necessary for the foundation of the practice of medicine. Interactive strategies are encouraged to foster more student participation.

 

Plenary Discussions

 

Clinical cases, group experiences or experiments may be discussed in a plenary session in an interactive manner to stimulate critical thinking. Through interactive case discussion and research-based discussion, students are encouraged to be more involved and to assume responsibility for their own learning.

 

Laboratory

 

Laboratory sessions are used for dissections, performance of experiments and microscopic study.

 

Small Group Discussions (SGD) and Preceptorials

 

These sessions provide an opportunity for students and faculty to interact in small groups. Critical thinking is stressed and the application of core material to clinical medicine or research is emphasized.

  

Facilitated Learning Sessions

 

Facilitated Learning Sessions are in-class or out-of-class sessions wherein students work independently or in small groups using a study guide with stated objectives or with faculty consultation.

 

These facilitated learning sessions allow the students to direct their own learning process, develop inquisitiveness and demonstrate research skills and ultimately pursue lifelong learning, all under the guidance of a faculty/mentor.

 

Academic Assemblies

 

Academic Assemblies are scheduled throughout the school year. These are venues for faculty or students to present their research and/or clinical work and other topics of special or significant interest. The scope has also been expanded to include topics of social relevance such Intellectual Property Rights, Gender Mainstreaming and Climate Change.

 

Clinical Training

 

By functioning as members of the healthcare team, students in the Fourth and Fifth Year are assigned to specific areas and responsibilities in their rotations. The students are expected to thoroughly know and analyze assigned cases, discuss them thoroughly with fellow doctors, provide the expected patient care appropriate for their level and complete the official medical forms of the patient. Each student is also allowed to perform or assist medical/surgical procedures with supervision of the Doctors in charge. Teaching rounds and preceptorials with the Faculty are regularly undertaken to supplement the clinical learning.

 

The clinical exposure also allows the student to interact with various patients and health personnel and experience diverse scenarios ultimately developing in them essential skills and attributes necessary for the practice of medicine.

 

RESOURCES

 

The St. Luke’s College of Medicine Library is a rich resource for many of the materials that are needed in the implementation of each course – from the textbooks to other supplementary materials.  Other web-based instructional material can also be accessed through the Library.  Aside from these, each department is also equipped with various teaching models (including cadavers) and adequate laboratory equipment.  Access to actual patient resources and other actual clinical material is generously provided by the St. Luke’s Medical Center.

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EVALUATION, GRADING AND GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

 

 

Various summative and formative strategies are used for evaluation of the students through the five years.

 

Objective Evaluation Strategies

 

Written Examinations

 

The periodical and final examinations comprise mostly of multiple choice questions. Essay tests or other forms of questions may also be used to address analytical concepts.

 

Evaluation during Plenary Discussion

 

In general, grades are based on the individual written report. However, a student’s oral presentation will be factored in the evaluation of his or her written report.

 

Evaluation for Small Group Discussion (SGD) and Preceptorials

 

Standardized evaluation tools are used during these sessions. Each year has a distinct evaluation form to appropriately emphasize the objectives of each level.

 

Evaluation of Clinical Work

 

Clerks and Interns are assessed on their clinical work and procedural skills by the Faculty Preceptors, Clinical Faculty and Residents using standardized Evaluation Tools.  

 

Formative Evaluation Strategies

 

Feedback

 

Most useful in any learning environment is timely, honest and constructive feedback to the students. Faculty members are urged to provide this in a professional manner and at the soonest possible time.

 

Reflection Paper

 

Patient Interview Feedback

 

Peer and Self Evaluation

 

Clerks and Interns Evaluation for Professionalism by Faculty, Residents and Hospital Staff

 

Attendance

 

Formative evaluation also hinges on attendance and participation.  Attendance is guided by specific school policies which are found in the Student Primer. As a general policy, the 20% rule will apply except when stated otherwise for certain subjects.

 

For Clerks and Interns, absences totaling at least 25% of the entire shift/rotation for the minor services or 20% of the entire shift/rotation for the major services will incur a repeat rotation. Absences of 40% or more of the total annual load may be ground for being dropped from the rolls.

 

GRADING

 

Final grades of the First to Third year are computed as follows:

 

            FOR YEARLY SUBJECTS:

6 Periodical grades (1/7 each) + final examination (1/7)

 

            FOR SEMESTRAL SUBJECTS:

3 Periodical grades (1/4 each) + final examination (1/4)

 

Each Periodical Grade is composed mainly of the Periodical Examination (100%). For periodicals with SGD, Case Discussions and Analysis, these activities will comprise 20% of the grade, while the 80% will be for the Periodical Examination. These rules are followed unless otherwise specified in particular subjects.

 

Clerks and Interns are graded in each rotation using the following grading system:

 

1.         Teaching rounds with faculty preceptor                              30%
2.         Long Exam                                                                    30%
3.         Ward work                                                                     40%
3.1.      Faculty Attending Physician and Clinical Faculty                    30%
3.2.      Residents                                                                       10%
4.         Attitude/Professionalism (must pass a qualitative evaluation)
5.         Skills List (must fulfill a minimum checklist of required skills)
6.         Evaluation by Nursing/Ancillary Staff

 

The grading system is numerical wherein 100 is the highest attainable grade and 75 is considered passing. All grades (including periodical grades) are reported up to 2 decimal points except for the FINAL grade which is reported as a whole number using the round-to-even rule (Example: 86.5 = 86. 87.5 = 88). The GWA will be reported using 2 decimal points

           

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

 

The Performance Evaluation Board (Promotions Board) reviews the performance of each student periodically. The review is conducted per year level.

 

The Performance Evaluation Board (Promotions Board) consists of the following members: Dean, Associate Deans, College Secretary, Registrar and the Department Chairs/Heads and Year Level Coordinators (of the respective year level/s to be assessed).

 

Each student is discussed with regards to his/her individual subject/course performance, cumulative academic performance, deportment and professionalism.

 

In the Promotions Board Meeting, final deliberations are made regarding promotion, retention or dismissal of a student. These are guided by established Policies on Student Promotions found in the Student Primer. Decisions on academic scholarship grants are also reviewed during this meeting in order to make a final recommendation to the Dean.

 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

 

Towards the end of the Fifth Year (Internship), the candidate for graduation must also take and pass a final Comprehensive Examination.

 

The academic requirements for the Doctor of Medicine program must be satisfactorily completed within the maximum residency period of 7.5 years to be reckoned from the first enrollment date to be eligible for graduation. The candidate for graduation must meet several conditions as required by CHED, all of which are found in the Student Primer.

 

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MANAGEMENT OF INSTRUCTION

 

 

METHODS OF EVALUATION

 

Performance Evaluation Meetings

 

Concerns in the delivery of each subject/course curriculum, are also discussed within the Performance Evaluation Meetings which are done periodically. Problems are identified and given recommendations by other members of the board. If further evaluation is necessary, a separate review/meeting with the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs is scheduled.

 

Faculty and course evaluation by students

 

Faculty and Course Evaluation are done regularly to improve the quality of instruction the students receive. The evaluations consist of numeric questions supplemented by short comments and feedback with open-ended questions.

 

A general evaluation is also conducted together with St. Luke’s Medical Center regarding Clerkship and Internship concerns on Instruction, Faculty and resources semi-annually.

 

A summary of the evaluation and feedback is given to each department to aid them in creating their syllabus for the following year as well as in improving the delivery of their curriculum.

 

Program Evaluation by Graduates

 

A standard Program Evaluation Form will be required for all graduates to accomplish after their graduation and as part of their clearance.

 

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SCHOLARSHIPS, HONORS AND AWARDS

 

Academic excellence is promoted among the students by way of granting scholarships and awards which are conferred yearly and upon graduation.

 

SCHOLARSHIP GRANTS

 

The St. Luke’s Medical Center, together with and in support of the St. Luke’s College of Medicine, embarked in an unprecedented feat of generosity by granting full scholarships to the best and the brightest students in the Philippines.

 

A full scholarship may be awarded to entering students who are bachelor degree holders who graduated with Latin honors from colleges/universities in the Philippines with NMAT ratings of 90% and above.  This scholarship covers tuition, laboratory and miscellaneous fees and books.

 

Likewise, a student promoted to the next year level may obtain/maintain a full scholarship provided that the GWA of the previous year is 85% or higher, with no grade lower than 80%.

 

Furthermore, exceptionally outstanding students may be awarded a total scholarship which covers all tuition fees for the whole MD program. These will be based on the following criteria:

•       Jose Ledesma Scholarship - for academic excellence

•       Robert Kuan Scholarship - for leadership

•       Bishop Manuel Lumpias Scholarship - for passion and spirit

 

STUDENT AWARDS

 

Students with the ten highest general weighted average of the batch are recognized yearly. Furthermore, the Top Two (2) students are awarded as Dean’s Listers for the year.

 

Starting SY 2016-2017, students who garner a GWA of 85.000 or higher per year level with no grade lower than 80.000 shall be recognized as the Dean's Listers for the school year.

 

GRADUATION HONORS

 

Upon the recommendation of the committee on Scholarship and Academic Honors with the approval of the Dean and the President, the College of Medicine will award the following honors to graduating students:

 

Summa cum laude      to graduates with GWA of 95.000-100.00 %

Magna cum laude      to graduates with GWA of 92.000-94.999 %

Cum laude                  to graduates with GWA of 89.000-91.999 %

 

Quasha Award            for academic excellence and leadership

President’s Award       for Outstanding Leadership

Dean’s Award              for the consistent Dean’s Lister

 

Most Outstanding Intern (per specialty and overall)

 

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